Welcome visitor you can login or create an account.
Manufacturers

Gift set with airplane F4U-5 Corsair 1/72 revell 64143

you will earn
$1.30
when buying this item
for your next purchase
Brand: Revell
Product Code: RV64143
Date Added: 28.10.2014
Cash Reward: $1.30
Availability: Out Of Stock
$25.99
What is Shipping Cost?!
Pounds Kilograms Rate
0-0.55 0-0.25 US$8.90
0.55-1.1 0.250-0.500 US$13.95
1.1-2.2 0.500-1 US$19.80
over 2.2lbs over 1kg US$19.99
Order over US$150 FREE SHIPPING
Gift set with airplane F4U-5 Corsair 
1/72
Revell  RV64143

Manufacturer: Revell
Scale: 1/72
Material: Plastic
Paint: Unpainted, Unassembled, Kit do not contain paints and glue.
Condition: New in Box
 

The Chance Vought F4U Corsair was an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II and the Korean War. Demand for the aircraft soon overwhelmed Vought's manufacturing capability, resulting in production by Goodyear and Brewster: Goodyear-built Corsairs were designated FG and Brewster-built aircraft F3A. From the first prototype delivery to the U.S. Navy in 1940, to final delivery in 1953 to the French, 12,571 F4U Corsairs were manufactured by Vought, in 16 separate models, in the longest production run of any piston-engined fighter in U.S. history (1942–53).The Corsair was designed as a carrier-based aircraft. However its difficult carrier landing performance rendered the Corsair unsuitable for Navy use until the carrier landing issues were overcome when used by the British Fleet Air Arm. The Corsair thus came to and retained prominence in its area of greatest deployment, land based use by theU.S. Marines.The role of the dominant U.S. carrier based fighter in the second part of the war was thus filled by the Grumman F6F Hellcat. The Corsair served to a lesser degree in the U.S. Navy. As well as the U.S. and British use the Corsair was also used by the Royal New Zealand Air Force, the French Navy Aéronavale and other, smaller, air forces until the 1960s. Some Japanese pilots regarded it as the most formidable American fighter of World War II, and the U.S. Navy counted an 11:1 kill ratio with the F4U Corsair.After the carrier landing issues had been tackled it quickly became the most capable carrier-based fighter-bomber of World War II. The Corsair served almost exclusively as a fighter-bomber throughout the Korean War and during the French colonial wars in Indochina and Algeria.In February 1938 the U.S. Navy Bureau of Aeronautics published two requests for proposal for twin-engined and single-engined fighters. For the single-engined fighter the Navy requested the maximum obtainable speed, and a stalling speed not higher than 70 miles per hour (110 km/h). A range of 1,000 miles (1,600 km) was specified.The fighter had to carry four guns, or three with increased ammunition. Provision had to be made for anti-aircraft bombs to be carried in the wing. These small bombs would, according to thinking in the 1930s, be dropped on enemy aircraft formations.On 1 October, the XF4U-1 became the first single-engine U.S. fighter to fly faster than 400 mph (640 km/h) by setting an average ground speed of 405 miles per hour (652 km/h) during a flight from Stratford to Hartford.The twin-engine Lockheed P-38 Lightning had flown over 400 mph in January–February 1939.The XF4U-1 also had an excellent rate of climb but testing revealed that some requirements would have to be rewritten. In full-power dive tests, speeds of up to 550 miles per hour (890 km/h) were achieved but not without damage to the control surfaces and access panels and in one case, an engine failure.Reports coming back from the war in Europe indicated that an armament of two .30 in (7.62 mm) (mounted in engine cowling) and two .50 in (12.7 mm) machine guns (one in each outer wing panel) was insufficient. The U.S. Navy's November 1940 production proposals specified heavier armament.ormal U.S. Navy acceptance trials for the XF4U-1 began in February 1941. The Navy entered into a letter of intent on 3 March 1941, received Vought's production proposal on 2 April and awarded Vought a contract for 584 F4U-1 fighters, which were given the name "Corsair" — inherited from the firm's late-1920s Vought O2U naval biplane scout which first bore the name — on 30 June of the same year. The first production F4U-1 performed its initial flight a year later, on 24 June 1942.

F4U Corsair
Vought F4U Corsair (USMC).jpg
A restored F4U-4 Corsair in Korean War-era U.S. Marine Corps markings
Role Carrier-capable fighter aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Chance Vought
First flight 29 May 1940
Introduction 28 December 1942
Retired 1979 (Honduras)
Primary users United States Navy
United States Marine Corps
Royal Navy
Royal New Zealand Air Force
Produced 1942–53
Number built 12,571
Developed into Goodyear F2G Corsair

 

Write a review

Your Name:


Your Review: Note: HTML is not translated!

Rating: Bad           Good

Enter the code in the box below:



Previous Product:
Fighter - bomber Tornado IDS 1/100 revell 06624
Price : $16.99
Next Product:
Gift set with the lunar spacecraft Apollo - module L "Eagle" 1/100 revell 64832
Price : $18.99